Will workplace bullying become increasingly covert and indirect?

Decades ago, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 declared that discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin is an unlawful employment practice. Before the enactment of Title VII, discriminatory employment practices were largely open and transparent. Because it was legal to exclude or classify workers and job applicants based on these categories, there was no need to hide it. Anti-discrimination law changed all that.

Overt workplace discrimination has declined considerably in the U.S. Both anti-discrimination laws and changing social attitudes have had a positive impact in that regard. However, many of those engaging in workplace discrimination have become more savvy about it, using less obvious practices that are harder to challenge, while refraining from uttering statements of bias that once were more common. In such circumstances, getting an employer to take a discrimination complaint seriously can be a more daunting task. The same goes for proving a discrimination claim filed with an agency or court of law.

What does this mean for workplace bullying?

Taking these trends into account, I’d like to offer a reluctant hypothesis: As workplace bullying continues to enter the mainstream of American employee relations, and as advocates for the workplace anti-bullying movement enjoy greater successes in public education, employer awareness, and law reform, bullying behaviors at work will become increasingly covert and indirect.

In other words, those who are inclined to engage in bullying will be aware of more enlightened public attitudes against such mistreatment. In time, they also will face greater liability exposure as the legal system responds more effectively. For some, these developments may discourage them from bullying. Others, however, will become more devious and more ingenious about how they mistreat their co-workers. These covert and indirect forms of bullying are harder to unpack than more transparent forms of work abuse.

The good news is that all of the positive developments concerning workplace bullying eventually should help to decrease the prevalence of bullying behaviors. The bad news is that those who bully others will be more likely to do so in ways that are difficult to sort out and address.

20 responses

  1. Yes,yes and yes! I am working in a reverse discrimination place right now. Black,male boss and the bullying is covert and dispicable. A group of his “peeps” copied a picture of a coworker and passed them out to others to draw,doodle,color in the womans face anything they wanted. It was a mix of woman and men and the target, a white woman. I was told about it from a woman that was so traumatized from it she quit this past Friday, up and quit. She told me she told the bolss but he did not have any reactin. Now, I am not sure what to do. I cannot quit yet.

  2. Hello David,

    Your statement…..

    “Overt workplace discrimination has declined considerably in the U.S. Both anti-discrimination laws and changing social attitudes have had a positive impact in that regard. However, many of those engaging in workplace discrimination have become more savvy about it, using less obvious practices that are harder to challenge, while refraining from uttering statements of bias that once were more common. In such circumstances, getting an employer to take a discrimination complaint seriously can be a more daunting task. The same goes for proving a discrimination claim filed with an agency or court of law.”

    …..is true and false. On the Presidential election night in November 2008 my youngest daughter called me with excitement. After over 200 years a person of diversity is elected to the highest public service office in the land.

    She was jubilant as were so many others. It was hailed as tremendous step forward and some even called it, America is finally “equal”. However, she was dismayed at my lack of enthusiasm. I told her, yes it’s an achievement and a step forward. I tempered her joy with a dose of truth.

    I informed her that now you see the last remaining covers of raco-terrorist hypocrisy being pulled off of America. From that time till the present she has acknowledged her eyes being opened by the reality of the place in which she and I live. The shameless naked personal attacks, disrespect, distortions of truth and attempts to marginalize any positive service from the Barak Obama by the conservative right wing is breathtaking.

    My research from 2008 to the present reveals an upswing in overt workplace discrimination. As for “changing social attitudes have had a positive impact in that regard” has swung more to exposing an insidious and hypocritical phenomenon diverse America has always been the recipient and victim of.

    What is it? A large segment of non diverse America has always maintained an attitude of being willing to hurt its’ own interest if the perception or reality of an outcome harms, hinders, denies, restricts or diminishes a benefit for diverse groups!!

    This condition continues as one of the most amazing displays of raco-terrorist discrimination. Oh and yes by the way, racism is a form of terrorist. As for the “reverse discrimination” concept, I ask this question,

    For something to be put in “reverse” means that it started in a forward or equitable position to start with. People of color have NEVER had equity to begin with!

    No non diverse individual whose existence has never been saturated in a moment to moment existence of raco-terrorism from birth to the grave is qualified to speak to what raco-terrorism or discrimination is or is not. I believe one of the reasons the wheels of providing federal Civil Rights Title VII protections against workplace bullying are so slow comes down to this….

    As you pointed out, “many of those engaging in workplace discrimination have become more savvy about it, using less obvious practices that are harder to challenge”. The “less obvious practices” involve bullying! Bad employers realize we can hide our raco-terrorism and other “isms” behind bullying because its legally easier for us to do an end run around the EEOC.

    Since there is no Title VII defense for the employee the workplace bully will only become more creative in its “overt workplace discrimination.”

    I close with this statement that I have partially modified from who I believe was the first person of diversity employed with the fire department of a majority California city reflecting his trials and tribulations in bullied and raco-terrorized;

    “Contemporary raco-terrorism has always been calculated to be hidden. Yet the victims of it have always been put in the position of having to prove its existence to the very ones that created, initiated, orchestrated, perpetrated, justified and institutionalized it!”

  3. Yancy,
    I agree with your points and as a white person who voted for Obama and will again, I have to make a point about the term “diversity.”. It DOES NOT refer only to people of color. It includes all of the things that make us different, such as age, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, etc.

    As far as racial discrimination is concerned, it, unfortunately, is alive and well in the world. However, even though I am hoping that Obama wins the election, what is a major part of that is that people of color will vote for him regardless of whether they even know what he stands for. I have heard only one person express the sentiment that she was sorry about that and she is a good friend of mine who happens to be African American. I haven’t heard anyone else be that honest. Racism cuts both ways and ignoring any facet of it doesn’t help the cause.

  4. Hello Mary,

    To your point….

    “I have to make a point about the term “diversity.”. It DOES NOT refer only to people of color.”

    …..you made an assumption on my meaning about “diversity” being exclusively racial ethnicity. Not to stray from the central topic of bullying however, your dissertation reflects some of the core “defensiveness” that’s always been reflected by the “majority”.

    For example, these statements….

    “As far as racial discrimination is concerned, it, unfortunately, is alive and well in the world.”

    “Racism cuts both ways and ignoring any facet of it doesn’t help the cause.”

    …. the use of the word “world” instead of America is indicative of the denial of America being the specific focus of this cancer . It also assumes I “ignored” the reality of anyone can be raco-terroristic. However, the statement “ignores” WHO is accountable and responsible for the authorship and initiation of the Mt. Everest that’s always been and continues to be in the room called the U.S.

    Additionally, the statement implies there’s always been an equity between diverse ethnic groups to have a heart and mindset attitude to be inequitable.

    For insight let’s use what I call the transposition principle;

    Anglo Europeans – kidnapped, raped, pillaged, stripped of “heritage”, denied freedom of movement, education, property ownership, brainwashed to believe they are inferior and more…for fully 300 years!

    While the oppressing Afro ,Oriental, or other ethnic people rape and pillage the “new world” forming economic, political, social empires and dynasties for the same 300 years and counting!

    Then GOD ALMIGHTY in HIS grace and mercy not Abraham Lincoln or any other man removes the “overwhelming” burden of all the aforementioned oppression.

    Yet the the heart and mindset of Afro-American or Oriental America or any other dominant ethnic group maintains by lifestyle and institution an intent to deny any hint of economic, political, justice and social equity for the next 200 years and counting.

    Here’s a scenario;

    My life experience has always been a carpenter am I qualified to speak to the life experience of a nuclear physicist?

    How then can any Anglo-American whose life experience has never been the life experience of a Black American speak to what is raco-terrorism and what it isn’t?

    Again your statement,

    “Racism cuts both ways and ignoring any facet of it doesn’t help the cause.”

    ASSUMES many in Anglo- America an have intimate experiential knowledge of what it has meant and means to be living black in the U.S.

    As as this statement……

    “…what is a major part of that is that people of color will vote for him regardless of whether they even know what he stands for.”

    ….so what? Isn’t that what Anglo-America has always done and continues to do? Every black candidate including President Obama has never gotten a majority vote from this particular group……white males!
    Hmmm….I wonder why?

    Does voting for someone simply because they look like you make sense, of course not. However, from the perspective of ethnic diversity having the first opportunity in over 200 years of “democracy” having ONE person to vote for that looks like you who is in a position of true political power share is at least understandable.

    If you don’t believe that just apply that “transposition principle” again.

    Finally, since there has always been two distinct realities of existence for Anglo and Black America I hope the following can be grasped. Here is a concept I’m almost certain the overwhelming majority of white America has never perceived or conceived.

    Understanding the distinction between these concepts;

    Race discrimination and Race resentment.

    “Racial resentment” is far more prevalent in black America toward Anglo America than an attitude of race discrimination.

    Remember this;

    “Contemporary raco-terrorism has always been calculated to be hidden. Yet the victims of it have always been put in the position of having to prove its existence to the very ones that created, initiated, orchestrated, perpetrated, justified and institutionalized it!”

    Having to prove to satan that beelzebub is evil to get justice when they are bosom buddies in purpose and intent would tend to create a growing attitude of frustration and environment of “resentment”, don’t you think?

    Transpose yourself into this scenario that has taken and takes place all day everyday somewhere in America for 200 years and counting…

    A black male going before an Anglo judge and predominately Anglo jury of his “peers” seeking equitable justice.

    Recall the night and day responses between Anglo and Black America to the O.J. Simpson murder trial? Why was that?

    Many in White America were outraged because they believed the jury of OJ’s peers (mostly black) let him off because he was black. In there eyes it was gross miscarriage of justice!

    However, even if that was true Anglo-America a slight look and insight to the same “justice” black Americans have gotten as the norm from the American justice system.

    Again, using the transposition principle would Anglo-America by human nature build a level of “resentment” for 500+ years of ongoing injustice hiding behind “freedom and justice” for all.

    Workplace issues such as bullying have always been there especially for different ethnic groups. They’ve just been hidden behind the curtain.

    My apologies to the moderator for length of this post. However, it is intended to raise awareness of the truth.

    • Yancy,

      You are lumping all of white America into a group that you feel comfortable with. That is the definition of racism. You don’t know me or my life experiences. So……I can say only that I’m sorry for the anger that you choose to carry around. I know how that feels, from my own life experiences.

      I will keep you and America in my prayers. I totally agree that Racism is alive and well in America (from all directions) and only Jesus can saves us from ourselves.

      Sincere regards.

    • I’m going to caution us against taking one or two things we disagree with in a person’s comments and using them to drive home an entire agenda way beyond the scope of that person’s comments.

      Having been on the receiving end of racial discrimination during my life, I also agree that bias and bigotry cut in many different directions. I do concur that some of these forms do not come close to the experience of many blacks in America, but all merit our care.

      Indeed, one of the underlying reasons why I’ve been active in this fight against workplace bullying is my conviction that everyone is entitled to a baseline degree of dignity on the job, regardless of their demographic characteristics or the groups with which they identify.

      • Mr Yamada, would you please remove my original post at the top of this thread? It was not intended to open up this kind of conversation between others, I was stating facts, that is all. The fact is, I work in a very awful place and am looking to remove myself. Life is way too short to work among those that bully others.

  5. Hello again Mary,

    Again, the “defensive” filter is causing you to read and assume and change the intention of my clear statements and meaning. I never said anything about “lumping” ALL white America in any context.

    Nor was my response aimed at you personally.

    I DO KNOW your life experiences have never been that of people of color in this country which WAS my point.

    Unfortunately, when truth exposes error the resort is find a flaw in the teller of the truth. As characterized by…

    “I can say only that I’m sorry for the anger that you choose to carry around.”

    Maybe my direct style of communication with no fluff or soft soak caused you some intimidation. I assure you no personal indictment was or is intended.

    Since you brought up my LORD and Savior Christ Jesus;

    You may want to read…..

    1 John 3:16-18

    Truth is not always pretty, kind, flattering or acceptable.
    However, it remains truth.

    When truth is bound in LOVE it then becomes the reflection
    of Christ.

    Thanks for sharing and all the best in your endeavors.

  6. Racism is very much alive and well in America. I would think in some cities/states, more so than others. Arizona!!!! Many a white mid 30’s to 45 year old male has absolutely NO PROBLEM making racist comments while on the job. It is disgusting. However, here in racist Arizona, the right to work state, nothing is ever done. I’m tired of all the politically correct words to use and phrases to be careful not to say. It is what it is. Some people are just plain hateful towards those of color, older in age and yes to those that attempt to do right by/for others. I personally wish I was older, old enough to properly retire and get away from the racists. Unfortunately I am not there yet. Unfortunately due to the economy and jobs I am stuck in this racist state. The majority of the people here leave much to be desired from a moral ethical point of view. Most CEO’s, upper management do absolutely nothing about the hatred towards those that are older, dedicated and of a different color. Don’t even let people know you are a Liberal or Democrat at work. In AriZona you might as well hang yourself. You will be humiliated by the majority of the haters here.

      • Yancey, could you provide us the sources of the studies indicating that 70 percent of bullying targets are people of color? I’ve read a lot of prevalence studies and never come across that figure, so I’d appreciate your directing me to the studies you’ve seen. It would be very significant data.

  7. Hello David,

    Both these WBI offerings show a combined number of
    Black and Hispanic bully experience number of 70%+

    http://www.workplacebullying.org/2010/09/06/race_2010_wbi/

    http://www.workplacebullying.org/multi/pdf/race_2010_wbi.pdf

    This 2007 study indicated the ethnic group bullied more than any other
    being Black Americans 46%. Even significantly more prevalent than others.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workplace_bullying#Race

    This site is informative in raising awareness of concepts within
    workplace bullying, such as

    racist bullying
    ethnic bullying

    Both of these concepts are credible to the discussion of what exactly
    is bullying at work and the need for Title VII definition and employee
    protection from same.

    ===> http://lamontstallworth.com/Articles/PDFS/racial-ethnic_bulling.pdf

    It’s very extensive and heavily mathematical formula oriented.

    My own unscientific study involving visitors to my employee rights sites
    and blogs indicate far higher percentages of bullying for people
    of color than white employees.

    This is based on their understanding on how bullying at work has been
    defined.

    In the absence of any federal definition and protection from workplace
    bullying any and all statistics are going to be distorted.

    As a result the characteristic lines of harassment, discrimination and
    bullying are interchangeable and blurred.

    In my opinion this provides the “perfect” cover for corporate cultures
    that encourage, endorse and condone the yet legal practice which has
    been unofficially named “workplace bullying”.

    • Yancey, I’m familiar with those studies, and looked at them again per this thread, but I don’t see how they support your claim that “that about 70% of all those bullied in the workplace are people of color.” In fact, at least in the U.S., given the demographics of population distribution dovetailing with the high levels of bullying over the lifespan, it may be next to a statistical impossibility.

      What the data do clearly show, in my assessment, is the higher prevalence of bullying directed toward people of color, based on self-reports. That, when combined with overall statistics on racial discrimination (while pointing out that discrimination and harassment are not necessarily synonymous), makes more sense to me.

      In any event, the effects of bullying on anyone should not be discounted, regardless of the target’s demographic profile. We shouldn’t ignore the higher prevalence rates for people of color, women, those of LGBT status, and the like, but ultimately the objective must be dignity for all.

  8. Hello David,

    I respect your assessment. However, I also said I’ve been conducting my own independent albeit unscientific research on the dynamic for a number of years.

    Hundreds of career seekers and employees many people of color I’ve talked to revealed a pattern of who the “majority” victims of bullying in the workplace are. Now those percentages have been on a ratio of about 60%. now the following is an arbitrary number as I’ve not researched it but let’s say for every 100 white males hired every hour there’s 10 black, Hispanic or middle eastern males.

    Out of that 100 white males there are 3 that are genuinely bullied for the duration of their employment experience. Out of the 10 Black, Hispanic or middle eastern males 7 are genuinely bullied for the duration of their employment experience.

    Here’s another hidden issue David not readily perceived, many people of color NEVER officially report or complain about workplace abuses during the totality of their employment. Why? there are several reasons not the least of which is a lack of knowledge about their Basic Employee Rights, which I’m dedicated to changing ;0)

    So, when we look at all these different studies the numbers are going to trend conservative at best.

    Bottom line, your statement…..

    “What the data do clearly show, in my assessment, is the higher prevalence of bullying directed toward people of color…”

    ……even if 60%, 51% it still speaks to WHO is the predominant victim of bullying in the workplace. The question of why is just as obvious.

    Regards,
    Yancey

  9. Hi Yancey,

    I just read this thread, and I don’t know what has been deleted, so I’m basing my comments on what is posted here now.

    My condolences regarding being Black in America. It sounds like it sucks.

    That said, it seemed to me that you were discounting the bullying experiences that some people had. Why? Just because they were White?

    That makes no sense. Having been hurt doesn’t justify hurting someone else. Having been born a certain color doesn’t make a person immune to pain or deserving of pain.

    Maybe I misinterpreted your comments.

    I had a teacher in college who insisted that EVERYBODY is racist. I suspect it may be true, for biological reasons, and it’s more than just racism. I have a heavy friend who makes anti-Jew comments. I had a gay hairdresser who hated fat people. Some Whites hate Blacks and vice versa, and it goes on.

    Personally, I try to monitor my thoughts and words, but I’m not perfect, so when I hear negative comments, I speak up, but kindly. I suspect most of us, of every race, are blind to our own biases. Having someone gently point out the meanness of our comments is a good way to become more aware and change.

    Instead of arguing about who has it the worst, why don’t we work together to stop abuse whenever and wherever we see it? Sometimes I’ve spoken up and made a difference. I’m proud of those times. Unfortunately, I’ve missed many more opportunities to be the hero and I regret that. For example, I recently had the opportunity to help an elderly man. I didn’t. Why? I’ve been asking myself that question over and over.

    Here’s what I’ve come up with so far… There were a lot of other people around, so I didn’t feel solely responsible. My husband had been annoyed with the man’s behavior earlier in the evening, so I didn’t want to get involved and risk my husband’s disapproval. It was late and we were tired. Mostly, it was because the old man stunk. How’s that for a reason not to get involved? I failed and I’m not proud of it. (In case you are wondering, a good person intervened and the old man did get help.)

    I’d like to become a better person, the type who has the courage and compassion to act EVERY time. Thoughts on how to achieve that?

    Yancey, regarding racism against Blacks in America, I’m curious to know what would help. As you pointed out, institutionalized racism existed in this country for hundreds of years, generation after generation. Of course that abuse shaped the Black experience, physically, mentally, financially, and spiritually. What happened can’t be retracted. As citizens, what can we do about it?

  10. Hello…..

    Maybe I misinterpreted your comments.

    …yes you did. People tend to filter what they want to hear to justify certain attitudes and long held traditions. When truth sheds light on things not previously perceived there will be acceptance or resistance.

    It’s been proven over and over when truth is spoken which exposes hypocrisy the focus is on finding some fault or issue with the messenger. Why? The truth is like a rock.

    Your statement…..

    when I hear negative comments, I speak up, but kindly.

    ….is evidence of that. “negative comments”?

    Truth that exposes hypocrisy is usually viewed as negative.

    Also here…

    “Instead of arguing about who has it the worst, why don’t we work together to stop abuse whenever and wherever we see it?”

    “Arguing about who has it the worst”, isn’t that exactly what the “colonies” used against England in their fight for what they perceived as freedom from injustice? Was not these same individuals themselves justifying hypocrisy by maintaining people in chains..denying them the very freedom the believed they were entitle to?

    It’s not about argument it’s about speaking truth and exposing lying hypocrisy and error. Whether it’s in the workplace or the greater society. How can there be any remedy or healing without honest and frank communication. If cancer is present is “Arguing about who has it the worst” not an appropriate discussion before researching ways to cure or remove it?

    Regarding this statement….
    “Yancey, regarding racism against Blacks in America, I’m curious to know what would help.”

    Here’s a hard truth but it is non the less truth. No law or regulation can legislate or change to heart of a man or woman. Only God Almighty can do that.

    However, the first step is to admit the denial. The U.S. has never acknowledged the hundreds of years of abominable atrocities perpetrated against the natives and especially against the millions kidnapped here against their will.

    You could take all the causalities of these wars, invasion occupations and other American tragedies….

    Revolutionary
    1812
    Civil
    Spanish-American
    WWI
    WWII
    Korea
    Vietnam
    Gulf 1
    Iraq
    Afghanistan
    Oklahoma City
    Sept. 11

    ……and guess what, they would add up to about 10% of all the people of African descent who lost their lives or been the victims raco-terrorism on this continent.

    Nonetheless, ALL these tragedies have some memorial or planned memorial. Yet for the GREATEST ongoing tragedy ever in the history of America the prevailing attitude from the “majority” is “get over it”. Using what I call the “transposition principle” would you have the same attitude of “Instead of arguing about who has it the worst”? The workplace is always going to be a microcosm of a society.

    Your next statement….

    “As you pointed out, institutionalized racism existed in this country for hundreds of years, generation after generation

    …. is a classic example of that denial. Which I believe is part of the subconscious of the dominate American culture. Why? look at the way it was worded. It’s worded in the PAST TENSE, “existed” not “exists”. The same mindset is inherent when some talk about civil rights. The prevailing statements will be along the lines of….

    “During the Civil Rights era…”

    As if it was a period of time that came and went or was some goal achieved. One thing is certain the struggle for civil rights equity and justice has always been ongoing.

    Earlier in this thread I said this;

    “Contemporary raco-terrorism has always been calculated to be hidden. Yet the victims of it have always been put in the position of having to prove its existence to the very ones that created, initiated, orchestrated, perpetrated, justified and institutionalized it!”

    Having to prove to satan that beelzebub is evil to get justice when they are bosom buddies in purpose and intent would tend to create a growing attitude of frustration and environment of “resentment”, don’t you think?

    Transpose yourself into this scenario that has taken and takes place all day everyday somewhere in America for 200 years and counting…”

    Until the “cause” changes, the reaction and “Arguing about who has it the worst” must go on. Why? Because those who have it the worst continue to get the worst. Isn’t fighting for justice what America says freedom and justice for ALL is all about? The American workplace is always going to reflect the true America.

    It would be a beautiful thing to see an America and American workplace free of the original engrained adverse attitudes and biases toward diversity that remain.

  11. Yancey,

    Believe it or not, I agree with many of your statements. What I have trouble with, regarding your comments, is that you can’t see outside of your own pain. You’re not the only person hurting.

    “Truth that exposes hypocrisy is usually viewed as negative.”
    I’d agree. That’s been my experience as well.

    Were the founders of this country racist? I don’t know enough about each of them, but Jefferson clearly was. From what I’ve read, Jefferson wrote much of the Declaration of Independence. Regarding the “all men are created equal” passage, from what I’ve read, Jefferson’s text was originally vague and flowery. It was Benjamin Franklin who edited Jefferson’s writing, clarifying the intent and adding the “self-evident” part. Were all the founders racist? Most likely.

    “However, the first step is to admit the denial. The U.S. has never acknowledged the hundreds of years of abominable atrocities…”
    I agree. To heal, this county needs to openly discuss what happened. How does that conversation get started? What kind of acknowledgement or memorial would help?

    “Having to prove to satan that beelzebub is evil to get justice when they are bosom buddies in purpose and intent would tend to create a growing attitude of frustration and environment of “resentment”, don’t you think?”
    It’s probably convenient to think of all Whites as evil. Is that the truth or just a lazy way to look at the world? If you accuse an entire race of people of being evil, how likely is it that they will champion your cause?

    “Because those who have it the worst continue to get the worst. Isn’t fighting for justice what America says freedom and justice for ALL is all about?”
    Totally agree.

    “It would be a beautiful thing to see an America and American workplace free of the original engrained adverse attitudes and biases toward diversity that remain.”
    Agree, and diversity includes diversity of thought.

    Yancey, what happened to Black Americans was an outrage. What IS happening to Black Americans needs to stop. You might be surprised how many “evil” White people would be willing to help you if you quit throwing stones at them.

    • Hello,

      “Believe it or not, I agree with many of your statements”

      Quite frankly, its not about whether you agree with MY statements. Its about acknowledging truth.

      Were the founders of this country racist?

      It is clear that this country was founded in raco-terrorist hypocrisy. I’m not going to try to convince you of that. however, I do have fountain of rock solid truth to support it. You have to deal with your conscience on that. What I will say is this “your founding fathers” weren’t the founding fathers of the millions kidnapped to this continent.

      Your responses in the following areas validate the premises I’ve posed.

      1) Can’t attack the message so find fault with the messenger.
      “….is that you can’t see outside of your own pain. You’re not the only person hurting.”
      I never said anything about having “any pain” or that I was “hurting”. I’m going to be real with you Mam, you are exposing the point I’ve being making. There is a deep seated defensiveness exhibited by Anglo America when raco-terrorst truth is spoken in the light of day. The truth says find fault with the speaker because we can’t find fault with what the speaker SAID!

      Ask yourself the question, why did you feel the need to subjectively make a determination about ME. When communication designed to foster understanding should be the ultimate goal. Even if there’s a difference of perspective, why does the communication devolve into a focus ob seeking flaw or issue with the speaker? Have I used any language casting an aspersion to find a flaw with YOU personally? Yet YOU have followed the same consistent pattern that has been predominant from Anglo-America in its response to issues of truth it has not previously encountered.

      2) “It’s probably convenient to think of all Whites as evil.” – Again, the defensive need to put words in the mouth and intent in the heart of the messenger. I never SAID or implied “ALL white people were evil.” I was using a figure of speech to make a point. “Is that the truth or just a lazy way to look at the world?” Again, focus on the messenger not the message. Hmmm….what’s the racial stereotype associated with “lazy”?

      3) If you accuse an entire race of people of being evil, how likely is it that they will champion your cause? When did I accuse “an entire race of people of being evil”. Again, the classic defensive posture to subjectively distort what was clearly stated to mean something else so I or we can justify our “innocence” for any accountability or responsibility. It’s not about “championing a cause” its about making a stand for truth.

      4) Your final statement nails it down….

      “You might be surprised how many “evil” White people would be willing to help you if you quit throwing stones at them.”
      It’s not about “White people would be willing to help you”. Look at how you worded that statement, “help you” again the focus is on ME , not the reality of the U.S. The consistent defensive posture, “evil” White people” which was never implied or voiced by me. The arrogance of the statement implies I’m asking for some “help”. Quite frankly, I Yancey Thomas Jr. don’t “your help”, whatever your meaning.

      I would hope that collectively this place as it relates to the issues affecting the workplace and society as a whole could finally acknowledge and embrace truth and discard lying hypocrisy. I will leave you with this…..

      If you can be objective, use the “transposition principle” I spoke about earlier in this thread. Then ask yourself would you have the same heart and mindset of conclusions as you do now?

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