Retirement party

Vinny during his last full week at Con Ed, Dec. 2012

Vin Poliseno in his Con Ed office, Manhattan, Dec. 2012 (David Yamada, photo)

Will the retirement party become a thing of the past?

I just finished a quick weekend trip to New York City to attend a retirement party for a long-time friend, Vincent Poliseno, who spent 44 years working for Consolidated Edison. Vinny and I met in 1989, when we started a master’s degree program in Labor and Policy Studies at Empire State College of the State University of New York. Both of us were great procrastinators, and it took us a loooong time to finish that degree program! But this allowed us to plant the seeds of an enduring friendship.

At Con Ed, Vinny began at the entry level, did two years of military service in the early 70s, and then returned and progressed steadily up the ladder. Most of his time was spent in Con Ed’s Manhattan engineering department, where he became a union shop steward and eventually served in a management role. His tenure at Con Ed covered many major crises facing the city, including 9/11 and Hurricane Sandy.

Celebrating in Brooklyn

At the scenic Giando On the Water restaurant near the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn, Vinny’s family, friends, and co-workers gathered to pay tribute to him upon his retirement. In addition to a great meal (hey, this was an Italian retirement party, after all), we were treated to a hilarious speech by one of Vin’s colleagues and brief but warm remarks from the guest of honor himself.

Vin is the kind of person who makes the extra effort to help people in good times and bad. It showed that night: He spent the last hour of the dinner posing for pictures with people who stood in line as the cameras clicked away.

For 44 years, Vin helped to keep the lights on. (Williamsburg Bridge, Brooklyn side, photo by David Yamada)

Vin helped to keep the city’s lights on for 44 years. (Williamsburg Bridge from Brooklyn; David Yamada, photo)

Goodbye to retirement parties?

In many ways, Vin’s career represents a throwback: 44 years at one company, steadily moving up, and finishing with a retirement party and a decent pension.

Unfortunately, that relatively secure path — earning the benefits of hard work and long-term commitment to a single employer — is rapidly going by the wayside. Many people in the age group immediately following Vin’s have been caught in the web of nasty layoffs by employers who deem them too expensive or otherwise expendable. Others have scant retirement savings and will have to work much later into their lives than they anticipated.

Different stories

The website of “Set for Life,” an excellent documentary by Susan Sipprelle on the challenges facing middle age workers in America, has been collecting stories of people who have been beaten up by this economy and job market. Here are snippets from three of them:

It’s getting worse, I’m now 55 and have been out of work for a year, like others, living off of my retirement. When I was in my 30’s, I could find another sales position in a week! Now no one will give me the time of day. They say that employers cannot discriminate because of age, yet every application I fill out asks for either date of birth or year of high school graduation. . . .

***

I am a 58-year old female and I’ve been unemployed since Sept. 2011. I was released from my job as a website administrator with very little explanation. . . . Right now I’m living off unemployment that will end very soon, my savings, and my retirement fund that are quickly dwindling. . . .

***

55 and wondering who pulled the trap door. Worked Fortune 100 for 27 years and have been out of work since 2008 with no luck at finding anything remotely close to the salary I once made. There are no Companies willing to hire in our age group, and even entry level jobs dont exist.

I’m not claiming that life “owes us” a steady job capped off by a nice party and a pension at the end. But it appears that we are witnessing the rapid demise of the post-WWII American middle class dream. The idea of a life well lived and played by the rules, including a relatively secure retirement, has become an illusion for millions.

***

Related post

Not “Set for Life”: Boomers face layoffs, discrimination, and bullying at work (2012)

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