Working notes: On screening out sociopaths, the anti-worker Supreme Court, heroic flight attendants, and much more

I’ve got lots of good stuff to share with you today. Here are seven items that may be of interest:

Forbes on Employee Screening for Sociopaths

Rob Asghar writes for Forbes magazine on “How To Screen Out The Sociopath Job Candidate.” His piece features psychiatrist Martha Stout, author of the compelling and chilling The Sociopath Next Door (2005):

I asked psychiatrist Martha Stout . . . how hiring managers and corporate boards can avoid unwittingly unleashing a sociopath within their organizations—especially at the senior levels.

“More and more businesspeople people are asking me about this,” she says.  “After all, having a sociopath can be expensive.” Indeed, they often aren’t extracted from an organization until they’ve caused permanent injury.

Dr. Stout offers four pieces of advice. Check out the full article if you’d like to read more. (You’ll probably have to click through a subscription invitation pop up first.)

I’m glad to see this topic getting mainstream media attention. While some “jerks” and abrasive bosses can be coached and counseled to interact with others more appropriately, those who behave abusively are in a different category. Among the latter include those with sociopathic and psychopathic traits, many of whom perpetrate or orchestrate the most damaging instances of workplace bullying and abuse.

Hat tip to eBossWatch

LA Times on Supreme Court Employment Law Decisions

Alana Semuels reports for the Los Angeles Times on employment cases decided during the recently concluded term of the Supreme Court, which includes a quote from me, among many others:

“You can see this common thread of making it more difficult to have your day in court,” said David Yamada, a professor at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. “The legal climate for employees is a tough one.”

The current incarnation of the U.S. Supreme Court continues to interpret federal employment and labor laws in ways that make it increasingly difficult for workers pursuing legal claims. It is fair to say that this is the most anti-worker Supreme Court of the modern, post-World War II era.

USA Today on the Heroic Flight Attendants of Asiana Flight 214

Ben Mutzabaugh from USA Today reports that last weekend’s crash landing of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport could’ve been much worse had it not been for the calm, brave responses of the flight attendants. Here’s his lede:

Asiana Airlines attendants are being lauded as heroes for their role in helping passengers to safety after the crash-landing of Flight 214 at San Francisco on Saturday.

Lee Yoon-hye, described by The Associated Press as the “cabin manager” who was “apparently the last person to leave the burning plane,” was among those being called out for her efforts to lead fliers to safety.

The heroic, life-saving work of the flight attendants is becoming one of the important backstories of this event. Read Mutzabaugh’s article for more details.

Next Avenue on Back to School at Midlife

Nancy Collamer, blogging for Next Avenue, offers some advice for workers who are considering degree and certificate programs to enhance their employability:

I suspect many Americans in their 50s and 60s are considering going back to school to improve their career prospects.

…But college isn’t cheap and there’s no guarantee that further schooling will lead to a new job or fatten your paycheck.

So when does it pay to go back to school after age 50 or so?

It’s a good piece if you’re thinking about a return to school. The Next Avenue site has become one of my favorites. Take a look and click around!

Dean & Provost on Being Thrown Under the Bus

J. Dirk Nelson, writing for Dean & Provost, a publication for academic administrators, addresses a situation that occurs all too often in academe — and elsewhere: That of being “thrown under the bus,” i.e., being scapegoated or wrongfully blamed. Here’s a snippet:

Political forces in colleges are never an easy ride, and unfortunately many careers have been shattered or significantly altered by the seemingly petty, arbitrary, capricious, discriminatory and often childish politically driven actions of others.

…(T)here certainly exist unsavory political forces on campuses, and consequently, a colleague (or you) may be “thrown under the bus” i.e., made the scapegoat or blamed for something that wasn’t his responsibility in the first place.

. . . The appropriate responses to being thrown under the bus — while possibly difficult in practice — are simple and sound in theory: Have a positive attitude, vent, behave with professionalism, and learn.

Do you agree or disagree? Nelson gets into a lot more detail in the full article, exploring a topic that will resonate with many people who are familiar with workplace bullying. Wrongful blame for mistakes made by others is high on the list of common bullying tactics.

Hat tip to Mike Schlicht, New York Healthy Workplace Advocates

Followup to Blog Post on the Stages of Dealing with Workplace Bullying

Earlier this month, I wrote a piece on what I characterized as the four stages of dealing with workplace bullying: Recognition, response, recovery, and renewal. Since then, thoughtful readers have shared their own stories of being bullied and the aftermaths.

For some honest, raw, courageous testimony about the toll that this form of abuse can exact, scroll down to the several dozen comments following my blog post, here.

Unpaid Internship Ruling Spurs Media Coverage

A federal court decision in June holding that unpaid interns working on the Fox Searchlight Pictures production of “Black Swan” were entitled to back pay under federal and state minimum wage laws has resulted in an abundance of media coverage. Here are three recent articles for which I was interviewed:

Bloomberg.com, Jim Snyder & Christie Smythe, June 27

“This question of whether private-sector internships violate the minimum wage laws has been sort of a sleeping-giant issue for many years,” said David Yamada, director of the New Workplace Institute at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. “The absence of payment is done with a wink and a nod. Interns know they better not make any trouble about this.”

Boston Globe, Taryn Luna, June 26

The majority of students who accept unpaid internships can only do so on their parents’ dime. This creates both a class issue, where more students from affluent families get a foot in the door, and a situation where employers limit their applicant pool, Yamada says.

In These Times, Michelle Chen, June 24

David Yamada, a labor law specialist at Suffolk University Law School, comments via email, “We’ll probably never know how many people from modest backgrounds don’t even bother applying for unpaid internships because they know they can’t afford it. But there surely is a strong element of economic class bias in this practice.”

. . . Yamada says that since it was filed in 2011, the Fox lawsuit has “led to the creation of informal networks of former interns and lawyers weighing the possibility of bringing lawsuits to challenge unpaid internships,” and has since developed intern networks that “are coalescing via social media and face-to-face gatherings. This is becoming a genuine social and legal movement.”

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