Measuring employer heart quality: How does an organization handle worker departures?

This hit me like a ton of bricks the other day: If you want to know whether an organization is a good place to work, take a look at how it treats people at the end of the employment relationship. In other words, the way in which an employer handles resignations, terminations, and retirements speaks volumes about how it values its workers.

Sure, hiring the right people for the right jobs is challenging work. But it’s usually a positive result and interaction. People are glad to get jobs, and employers are pleased to hire new folks to fill their needs. Most everyone feels good about it.

However, concluding an employment relationship is quite another matter. This is, after all, a separation, and with it goes much of the perceived value the worker offers to the employer. For various reasons, the employer, employee, or both have decided that it’s time to part company.

It may involve a resignation or voluntary departure: A worker retires. Another goes to a competitor. Still another pursues a new vocation.

It also could be in the form of an involuntary termination: Perhaps someone is performing under expectations or isn’t a good fit for the position. Maybe business is bad and layoffs are deemed necessary.

Does the organization handle these myriad departures with class and decency, and maybe even support and kindness when appropriate? Or does it treat people as disposable parts, exhibiting as little grace as possible? In the case of involuntary separations, does it typically use the ritual degradation ceremony of same-day terminations, often with an escort out of the building?

Finally, does the organization conduct a genuine exit interview when an employee decides to leave, or does it simply assume that every departure short of a termination is “voluntary” and for positive reasons? Good employers want honest information about why people leave; bad ones prefer to assume there’s nothing wrong.

Of course, where a forced resignation or involuntary termination is the final piece of an extended period of bullying, mobbing, or harassment, then that says all we need to know about organizational integrity.

In sum: Quality workplaces do their best to conclude employment relationships with humanity and dignity, while less wonderful others treat soon-to-be-former workers as “unpersons,” to be quickly processed, dispatched, and (oftentimes) forgotten in a coldly efficient manner.

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