“Mass exploitation hidden in plain sight”: Idaho-bound to discuss unpaid internships

equality-in-employment

Tomorrow I’m off to Boise, Idaho to participate in a conference — “Equality in Employment” — sponsored by the Idaho Law Review. On Friday I’ll be discussing the legal and policy implications of unpaid internships as part of a panel on exploitative labor practices.

The title of my talk and a forthcoming essay to appear in the Idaho Law Review is “‘Mass Exploitation Hidden in Plain Sight’: Unpaid Internships and the Culture of Uncompensated Work.” The first part of the title is a quote taken from a passage in Ross Perlin’s Intern Nation (rev. ed. 2012), with Ross’s blessing.

Here’s the abstract for my talk:

Although gaining internship experience has become a largely expected rite of passage for those seeking entry into many professions and vocations, until recently the legal implications of unpaid internships had remained something of a sleeping giant. In recent years, however, growing attention has been directed to this subject through litigation, legislative advocacy, social activism, and media coverage. My remarks, drawing on previous and current scholarship, will summarize the emergence of the so-called intern economy, examine the two primary legal issues relating to unpaid internships, and discuss several significant, broader policy themes concerning the intersection of internships, education, and the nature of paid employment.

It’s a lot to cover in 25 minutes, but I’ve become pretty good at focusing on the highlights! In addition, I’m looking forward to a stimulating day of presentations and discussions with learned colleagues and students at the University of Idaho College of Law.

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