Work-related travel can expand horizons

The Idaho Law and Justice Center (photo: DY)

The Idaho Law & Justice Learning Center, Boise (photo: DY)

On Saturday night I returned from an excellent conference on equality in employment, organized and hosted by the student editors of the Idaho Law Review at the University of Idaho College of Law in Boise. As I wrote last week, I was heading out there to talk about the exploitative aspects of unpaid internships. I also was looking forward to learning more about the work of fellow presenters.

This was a splendid gathering. The panel discussions were interesting and informative, and the conference was organized in a way that provided time for informal conversations in between panels and during meals. (As regular readers of this blog are aware, I’m a big fan of smaller conferences that allow chances for genuine interaction, and this one fit the bill.) I am especially grateful to Idaho Law Review Symposium Editors Molly Mitchell and Ingrid Batey, Professor John Rumel, and Dean Mark Adams for being such warm hosts and for making the event such a stimulating and educational experience.

WPA mural inside Law and Justice Center (photo: DY)

One of the beautiful WPA murals inside the Learning Center (photo: DY)

This all-too-brief visit reminded me of how even work-related travel can expand our cultural horizons. As many of the east coast visitors (including me) observed, this was our first visit to Boise. It was a wonderful chance to discover this charming city and to learn more about the legal profession and legal education in Idaho. The conference was held in the Idaho Law & Justice Learning Center in downtown Boise, an historic old building with an interior featuring vintage Works Progress Administration murals. The downtown area is home to a lot of great architecture, with a very nice selection of shops and eateries, as well as the State Capitol building and other governmental entities. It’s a cool city that I’d be delighted to visit again.

Idaho Law is the only game in town for those seeking a legal education within the state, giving its students a near monopoly on legal internships and part-time jobs. It’s no surprise, then, that Idaho alums play leading roles in the state’s legal, business, and public sectors. For those of us used to bigger cities with multiple law schools competing for attention and access to jobs, it was very interesting to see how this law school plays such a central, hub role for the state’s legal community.

Sharing a humongous apple pancake with Drs. Gary and Ruth Namie

Sharing a humongous apple pancake with Drs. Gary and Ruth Namie

My Idaho visit also allowed me to enjoy a hearty pre-flight breakfast and conversation with long-time friends and colleagues Drs. Gary and Ruth Namie, founders of the Workplace Bullying Institute. Gary and Ruth moved from Washington State to Boise last year to be closer to family. Our meal at a local pancake house not only was gastronomically superb, but also gave us a chance to catch up in person and to do some planning. It was a real treat to see them and left me with even more ideas to contemplate on the ride home.

3 responses

  1. Pingback: College of Law Accomplishments

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