Learning Mind: Deep vs. shallow people

From the Learning Mind site comes this neat little piece about the traits that distinguish deep from shallow people:

We talk about deep people and shallow people all the time, but what does it really mean to be deep and how can we cultivate this depth?

The article cites five primary traits of deep people:

  • “Deep people see beyond appearances”
  • “Deep people don’t believe everything they hear or read”
  • “Deep people listen more than they speak”
  • “Deep people think through the consequences of their behavior”
  • “Deep people try to get past their egos”

The piece goes into greater detail on each of these five traits. It’s well worth a click and a quick read.

Applied to organizational leaders

Think about the leaders at workplaces that you’ve experienced. Take some close looks at our civic and political leaders. How do they stack up against these five traits?

I think it’s pretty obvious that quality leaders have these traits in abundance. The not-so-good leaders come up short.

Of course, these are great qualities for all of us to emulate, both at work and in our personal lives. Sometimes simple lists like this one offer some big lessons.

***

Hat tip to Del Carmen for the Learning Mind piece.

One response

  1. Having worked in and around legal communities, I wish more people were concerned about deep fairness/justice vs. shallow fairness/Justice; deep conversations and communications with an emphasis on mutual learning, vs. shallow, presumptive and elitist unilateral communication and learning destroying rote processes. The torts, civil violations, and damages which accompany workplace bullying behavior can be best, and perhaps only, understood with a respect for, and emphasis on, deep fairness/justice.
    Sure, we’re talking about increased time and care here, but that should be right up the alley for every law school and its student activists to explore solutions for the often extreme harm done by workplace bullies.

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