Education for life’s afternoons and evenings

One of my favorite passages pertaining to the importance of adult learning is found in psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Modern Man in Search of a Soul (1933). He asks, “Or are there perhaps colleges for forty-year-olds which prepare them for their coming life and its demands as the ordinary colleges introduce our young people to a knowledge of the world and of life?” He answers:

No, there are none. Thoroughly unprepared we take the step into the afternoon of life; worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and ideals will serve us hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the programme of life’s morning – for what was great in the morning will be little at evening, and what in the morning was true will at evening have become a lie. I have given psychological treatment to too many people of advancing years, and have looked too often into the secret chambers of their souls, not to be moved by this fundamental truth.

To borrow from Jung, we sure could use some schools to help us understand, shape, and engage the afternoons and evenings of our lives. I’m not necessarily talking about formal degree programs, although they may well enter the picture for older adults seeking a career switch. Rather, I’m thinking more along the lines of adult education centers — both physical and virtual — that offer affordable, interactive, community-building learning experiences on topics related to life’s big picture topics.

As a possible model, I nominate The School of Life, a London-based, global learning center that offers courses, counseling, and publications “dedicated to developing emotional intelligence” by applying “psychology, philosophy, and culture to everyday life.” Their offerings cover personal relationships, the workplace, the self and others, and culture. Here’s a three-minute video that describes more about their offerings:

The School of Life’s originally opened in London, and it has since added centers in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Berlin, Istanbul, Melbourne, Paris, Sao Paulo, Seoul, Sydney, Taipei, and Tel Aviv. I would be delighted to see one in Boston!

Regardless of whether The School of Life is the preferred model, my larger point is that themes of lifelong learning, lifespan development, and inevitable aging lead us to ask what educational opportunities exist for people to learn and grow together during life’s second half. Alas, I submit that we face a gaping shortage of such options. Especially given the aging populations of many nations, it would be great to see more “colleges for forty-year-olds” (and older, of course!) to help people make the most of their lives.

2 responses

  1. Thanks for this thoughtful piece.

    My thoughts went to (1)formal institutional avenues for a School of Older Life – virtual, communities of practice, etc and (2)how Australian Indigenous communities and others experience, celebrate and acknowledge the wisdom of Elders and (3)informal “schools” or learning opportunities for learning and valuing Elderhood created in spaces and places such as neighbourhoods, service clubs, rural communities, unions, community centres, local libraries and drop-in centres, community learning exchanges. They are already there but because they are informal they might not be noticed by those wanting to research or comment on these issues; and (4)how families and esp families in some cultures value Elders, aunties and uncles and what they offer and ask of their families.

  2. I really like this idea as I stumble through my fifties.

    On Sun, Nov 18, 2018, 5:01 PM Minding the Workplace David Yamada posted: ” One of my favorite passages pertaining to the > importance of adult learning is found in psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Modern > Man in Search of a Soul (1933). He asks, “Or are there perhaps colleges for > forty-year-olds which prepare them for their coming life a” >

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