Sharing insights about workplace bullying and mobbing in SafeHarbor, Part II

In my last post, I wrote about my visits to SafeHarbor (link here), the online site created by Dr. Gary Namie, co-founder of the Workplace Bullying Institute, to serve as “a community dedicated to the people affected by workplace bullying and those devoted to helping them.” I also shared some past blog pieces that I’ve posted for SafeHarbor members.

Creating safe online spaces surrounding difficult and sometimes painful topics is a challenge, and the success of SafeHarbor so far has been the generation of a spirit of support, understanding, and kindness. Gentle is the word I would use to describe the online voices of those serving as facilitators and discussion leaders. This does not preclude respectful differences of opinion. But it does set a peaceful vibe that runs counter to the experiences that brought many to the site.

Here are more past blog articles that I’ve posted to SafeHarbor:

  • Workplace bullying and mobbing in academe: The hell of heaven? (2009, rev. 2014) (link here)
  • How harmful thought patterns about workplace bullying and mobbing may accelerate the aging process (2019) (link here)
  • When a prominent employee is fired for creating “an abusive work environment” (2018) (link here)
  • We understand human dignity only if we also comprehend humiliation and abuse (2015) (link here)
  • Workplace mistreatment: The importance of cross-situational empathy (2015) (link here)
  • Shame-based organizations: When workplaces resemble dysfunctional families (2015) (link here)
  • “Jerks at work” vs. workplace soul stalkers (2017) (link here)
  • “Master and servant”: The roots of American employment law (2013) (link here)
  • Life lessons from Dr. Edith Eger, Auschwitz survivor (2018) (link here)
  • What separates the “best” workplace abusers from the rest? (2015, rev. 2019) (link here)

2 responses

  1. Dear Dr. Yamada,
    If you have any articles on racism and microaggressions as part of workplace bullying for BIPOC people could you please post them in SafeHarbor? While people at SH may be fairly gentle in their public posts there is a real lack of understanding of how the experience of WB for BIPOC people might be different from that of white people. Some of the private comments are not gentle at all and very similar to the types of WB BIPOC people have experienced. The levels of ignorance and denial if you bring these issues up is very demoralizing. Many BIPOC people don’t post or stay on the the site because of the undercurrent of racism there, they don’t feel safe. This leads to further feelings of invisibility and isolation. While all lives matter, not all are valued, and this is coming across rather clearly to BIPOC people at SH currently. I am hoping that as a well-respected BIPOC person who is expert in the field of WB, you might have better luck helping people to understand other perspectives well enough that SH can be a truly safe place for all people.

    • Hi Zelda, thank you for your comment. Because most forms of workplace aggression directed at racially diverse individuals will be categorized as variations of race discrimination and harassment, the literature you seek likely will be in those research categories. However, please note that Workplace Bullying Institute research surveys have sometimes analyzed target data by race, and that information may be helpful to you as well.

      As to SafeHarbor, I am sorry to read of your concerns. I am not privy to the private comments on the site (I am a regular member, just like you), but I will have my antennae up for any public posts that merit attention.

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