Thanks a million — and lots more to come!

I’m doing a quick little celebration here. Sometime over the past hour or so, this modest little blog recorded its one millionth “page view,” or “hit.” When I started Minding the Workplace some nine years ago, I had no idea whether it would endure or attract any interest. But thanks to you, my readers, what began as an opportunity to share some of my work and observations  — mainly about workplace bullying and abuse — has grown into a more broad-ranging source of commentary about the experience of work and related topics.

Because of a packed schedule, I admit that I’m sort of gliding into this first million. During the past six months I’ve been extremely busy on matters that overlap with many topics raised on this blog. They include co-editing (with Dr. Maureen Duffy) a forthcoming two-volume book set, Workplace Bullying and Mobbing in the United States and serving as the founding board chairperson of a new non-profit organization, the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence, launched over the summer and going operational online in January. These initiatives, along with a sea of other writing and organizational commitments, have caused me to post less frequently here.

That will change next year, as I plan to resume a more frequent blogging schedule. Among other things, I’m going to be drawing regularly from Workplace Bullying and Mobbing in the United States and our more than two dozen contributors to offer snippets of commentary, research, and insight on work abuse. There’s so much in these two volumes that will be worth summarizing and discussing.

Of course, the world of work will continue to supply an ongoing stream of topics to write about, including cutting-edge research by scholars, compelling commentary by journalists and fellow bloggers, and real-life events and trends that demand our close attention.

I look forward to sharing this with you during the months and years to come!

 

Feedspot tags MTW a top workplace and bullying blog

Feedspot, a popular online content reader, has named Minding the Workplace a “Top 75 Workplace Blog” and a “Top 20 Bullying Blog.” MTW was listed 39th among the top 75 workplace blogs and websites and 9th among the top 20 bullying blogs and websites.

I’m very grateful to be included in both of these listings. This is my ninth year of writing this blog, and it remains one of the most rewarding parts of my work. Over the years I’ve received very positive feedback on many articles. I’m especially aware that MTW has helped many  targets of workplace bullying, mobbing, and abuse to understand their experiences and, when possible, develop strategies for responding.

I didn’t know what to expect when I began this blog, but the experience has been very meaningful. Of course, it all starts and ends with you, my readers, and I thank you for your ongoing interest.

A dignity salon

Group shot from December 2016 HumanDHS workshop in NYC

My association with Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), a global network of scholars, practitioners, students, artists, and activists committed to advancing human dignity and ending humiliating practices, has been a gratifying source of renewal, fellowship, and friendship. Until recently, however, my only opportunity to engage in face-to-face interactions with members of this remarkable community has been through HumanDHS’s annual December workshop in New York City. This wonderful event has always left me wanting for more.

Now, however, a smaller group of HumanDHS community members has started meeting on a regular basis in New York for open-ended conversations about ideas and projects on broad themes of shared interest.  I hopped on a Boston-to-NYC train to participate in the latest get-together on Saturday, and I’m very glad that I did. The planned three-hour gathering, with a dozen or so people meeting in a typically snug Manhattan apartment living room, spilled over our allotted time.

Our loose format starts with brief self-introductions that may include mentions of recent activities and life events. Sometimes the introductions themselves prompt deeper conversations. On other occasions the discussion will be gently guided by our unofficial convener. The topics vary widely, ranging from the personal to the global. For example, during an earlier meet-up, I was grateful for the opportunity to share the challenges that a dear friend of mine is facing in connection with severe interpersonal and work abuse. Saturday’s meeting, by contrast, included more talk about broader economic and political contexts and how we can promote human dignity as a chief framing concept for our society.

I realized after our latest meeting that we are creating our own version of a salon, a term commonly associated with small gatherings held at someone’s home, featuring conversations over food and drink. Salons were very much in fashion in New York City a century ago, organized by (mostly) left-leaning women who hosted discussions for intellectuals and artists, with libations offered to fuel smart and witty repartee. More recently, right before online discussion forums became so popular, the Utne Reader magazine promoted salons as a way of building community through conversation. (For more on that, see Jaida N’ha Sandra & Jon Spayde, Salons: The Joy of Conversation (2001).)

Our salon (if I may now call it that) is likely more serious in content than others, with tea and coffee supplanting alcohol as beverages of choice. It also reflects a conscious effort to grow the supportive community fostered by HumanDHS’s December workshop and social media outreach. As one participant characterized it yesterday, we are building an intentional tribe. In a world that cries out for more strong, caring connections with others, this is something to celebrate.

***

On a personal note, this was the latest in a lengthy stretch of out-of-town trips for both personal and work-related reasons. I looked back at my calendar book (yes, I still use the printed variety) and saw that I’ve been out of town during parts of almost every week since late April, and this will continue through the summer. My travel schedule and a ton of personal and work-related commitments are the main reasons why I’ve been blogging less frequently, but it’s all good. Every trip has been mainly about being with wonderful people.

School’s out (sort of), and summer beckons

In Boston, the weather isn’t quite there yet. I took this photo of the park near my home in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood a couple of years ago.

Hello dear readers! Classes have just finished up at my university, and I’ll be grading exams and papers for the next couple of weeks. I’m also gearing up for a busy summer of writing projects, organizing work, and speaking commitments before returning to classes in late August.

What follows is a mish-mash of items that may be of interest:

Essay about blogging

Osmania University, one of India’s oldest and largest universities, invited me to contribute an essay about an aspect of my work to a volume of commentaries in honor of its centennial celebration. I opted to write a piece about how this blog has allowed me to share ideas and information with a diverse audience inside and outside academe. Titled “Blogging About Work, Workers, and Workplaces,” the essay emphasizes the public education work I’ve been doing concerning workplace bullying and worker dignity through this blog. The book — Insights on Global Challenges and Opportunities for the Century Ahead — has just been published, and you may access a pdf of the full e-edition here (beware, it’s a huge file), with my piece appearing on page 107.

Happy 100th to Osmania U!

Speaking appearances

I’ll be heading off to participate in two of my favorite conferences this summer:

Work, Stress and Health Conference, Minneapolis, MN (June)

The biennial Work, Stress and Health Conference is co-hosted by the American Psychological Association, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the Society for Occupational Health Psychology. I’ll be participating on two panels this year:

  • A panel titled “Trauma-Informed Best Practices for Responding to Workplace Bullying and Mobbing,” with Drs. Gary Namie and Maureen Duffy, during which I’ll be discussing how research insights on psychological trauma can inform employment lawyers and other legal stakeholders; and,
  • A panel titled “Non-standard work arrangements: A discussion of taxonomy and research priorities,” organized by researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, during which I’ll be discussing legal and policy issues covering workplace safety and health for independent contractors and other “gig economy” workers.

If you’d like a sense of why I value this conference so much, two years ago, Psychology Benefits Society, the blog of the APA’s Public Interest Directorate, shared my write-up on the 2015 gathering, “Conferences as Community Builders.”

International Congress on Law and Mental Health, Prague, Czech Republic (July)

The biennial International Congress on Law and Mental Health is sponsored by the International Academy for Law and Mental Health. I’ll be part of two panels this year:

  • A panel announcing and discussing the launch of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence, a new, non-profit learned society dedicated to supporting therapeutic jurisprudence, the school of legal philosophy and practice that examines the therapeutic and anti-therapeutic properties of law and public policy, legal systems, and legal institutions; and,
  • A panel titled “Therapeutic Jurisprudence in Higher Education,” during which I’ll be presenting a short paper on”Addressing Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Incivility in Higher Education: The Roles of Law, Cultures, Codes and Coaching.”

As the panel topics suggest, this conference is a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with friends and colleagues from the therapeutic jurisprudence community. I did a write-up on the 2015 conference in Vienna, Austria here, as well as a little travelogue summary posted to my personal blog here.

Wallet Hub feature on securing entry-level jobs

If you have kids who are in college or otherwise preparing to enter the workforce, or if you’re planning a return to the workforce yourself, you may find helpful this extensive WalletHub.com piece on securing entry-level jobs. I was among those interviewed for an “Ask the Experts” advice section on screening and evaluating entry-level job opportunities.

Notable books

I like to feature interesting books in this blog, but I’ve been negligent about tagging relevant posts in the “notable books” category. To remedy that, I spent a chunk of time going back to previous posts that discuss important books and adding the tag. You can scroll through those posts here.

From the archives: Some overlooked nuggets

(image courtesy of 1001freedownloads.com)

(image courtesy of 1001freedownloads.com)

Minding the Workplace now covers some eight years of blogging, including nearly 1,500 articles posted. Many of these pieces have staying power thanks to Internet search engines; articles from years ago continue to attract page views as a result. But some pieces don’t get many search “hits,” even if they’re still relevant. I’ve gathered ten of these articles from the middle years of this blog (2011-2014). None rank among the 250 most-read posts, but I believe they’re worth reading. I hope you’ll agree!

Selective praise as a form of workplace marginalization (2014) — “Have you ever worked in an organization where some people receive lavish praise from higher ups for the most modest of achievements, while others do remarkable things but receive, at best, an obligatory nod from the folks in charge?”

Understanding the Holocaust (and why I’m writing about it in a blog about workplaces) (2014) — “Allusions to the Holocaust, Nazis, Hitler, and the like must be offered carefully. This includes discussions involving employee relations. Even terrible workplaces are not concentration camps. But I respectfully suggest that these comparisons are important and useful when severe workplace bullying and abuse are under examination.”

Workplace gossip: From intelligence gathering to targeted bullying (2014) — “Spreading malicious gossip is among the most frequent bullying tactics used, especially by those who demonstrate psychopathic qualities. Calculatedly and without conscience, they plant the seeds in casual conversations and e-mails: Oh, you know what I heard? Guess what so-and-so told me. You can’t share this with anyone, but….”

Words rarely heard: “Boss, I think you need to get some help” (2013) — “The hierarchical nature of our workplaces often means that managers, supervisors, and executives who engage in bullying and other aggressive behaviors will not be referred to counseling or mental health services, and their suffering co-workers will continue to pay the price. Let’s take a look at why this is so.”

On creating organizational culture: What if your boss simply doesn’t care? (2013) — “We talk about good leaders who strive to create healthy organizational cultures, the places where people want to work. We talk about bad leaders who crack the whip, bully, and treat others as expendable parts. But what about bosses who don’t think much at all about the quality of work life within their organizations?”

Professional schools as incubators for workplace bullying (2012) — “It has long been my belief that the seeds of workplace bullying are planted in professional schools that prepare people to enter occupations such as law and medicine.”

Are some workplaces “bullying clusters”? (2012) — “Are bullying and related behaviors concentrated within a smaller number of toxic workplaces? . . . The concept of a cancer cluster has led me think about whether we can designate specific workplaces as “bullying clusters.” If we can, is there value in doing so?”

Can workplace incivility ever be healthy? (2011) — “Those of us who study workplaces generally assume that incivility is a bad thing. After all, an interaction involving incivility can ruin a work day, especially if it comes from your boss. At times, incivility can elevate into active disrespect and even bullying. . . . However, there are times when incivility may be an understandable consequence of a disagreement or difference of opinion. Such exchanges — often marked by the use of otherwise rude, harsh, or offensive words — can clear the air, hopefully paving the way toward a healthy resolution.”

How lousy organizations treat institutional history (2011) — “How do lousy organizations treat their own institutional history? In other words, how do they treat their past, recent or otherwise?”

Loyalty, “betrayal,” and workplace bullying: Does insider status matter? (2011) — “Suppose an employee openly disagrees with a position taken by her boss. Does her status as an insider or outsider impact the likelihood of being bullied by the boss? In other words, is a boss more likely to bully a “disloyal” subordinate who is part of his inner circle or favored group versus one who is not?”

A poem for our times

Hymn for Harmony

Gently bring each newborn stranger
To a better world than this;
Let the babe be free from danger,
Surroundings free from prejudice.
Denounce the clouds of war, suspicion,
Shades of envy’s animus;
Free from frauds and superstition
Our minds held free of Erebus.
Turn our terroristic talent
Apart from hate’s tendentious view;
Invigorate the good and gallant
In every human heart and hue.
Religion’s gods do all require
In every breast humility;
Contributors to wisdom’s choir
As part of world-wide harmony.

-C.A. Marshall Jr.

***

Note: Long-time readers know that this blog is pretty short on poetry and other creative works. However, Chet Marshall, a Major Gifts Officer at Valparaiso University, my undergraduate alma mater, recently shared with me this poem by his late father. Chet’s friendly and gracious support has helped me to reconnect with VU in a very welcomed way. I thought that his father’s poem is a wonderful response to so many of the headlines that are dominating our national and international news. 

The Orlando nightclub massacre and our American realities

Cropped screenshot from the Orlando Sentinel website

Screenshot from the Orlando Sentinel website

Our latest American tragedy is a mass shooting with fifty fatalities and over fifty casualties, the result of a one-man rampage at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The unfolding facts suggest that the attacker, a native-born American citizen, was motivated by both an affinity for ISIS and a hatred of gays.

Already many pundits, politicians, and spin doctors are trying to attribute this to a single cause, but I hope we are too smart to fall for their lines. Yes, this is about a significant, ongoing terrorist threat posed by ISIS. Yes, this is about the fact that our LGBT brothers and sisters remain specially vulnerable to acts of hatred and violence. And yes, these shootings were perpetrated by someone who had previously drawn the attention of the FBI, yet was able to walk into a store and buy assault weapons. It all matters, and it all should be a part of America’s national discussion.

Although large-scale shootings may be a distinctly American form of violence, terrorism is not. We share with many of our fellow citizens of the world the experience of terrorist attacks. This is likely to remain our global reality for the foreseeable future.

The Orlando massacre occurs in the midst of an ugly, petty, vulgar presidential campaign. Our economy is shaky, a lot of people are struggling to make ends meet, and climate change poses a terrible threat to our planet and its people. At times, it feels like we’re coming apart at the seams. Previous generations have faced times equally or more dire, however, so it’s up to us to step up and help turn things around. It won’t be easy, but we have no other acceptable choice.

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